Thursday, October 26, 2023 – D&B Construction, a construction industry leader in Berks County, is thrilled to announce that our renovation and expansion project for Stratix Systems new headquarters in Wyomissing was awarded building with the Building Berks Award under the “Commercial Offices” category.  This recognition comes from the Greater Reading Chamber Alliance (GRCA) and acknowledges our commitment to excellence in construction and our dedication to preserving the heritage of this historic building.

Stratix Systems, situated in the heart of Wyomissing, marked an ambitious endeavor that involved the complete renovation and expansion of a 79,382 square foot building, giving it new life and purpose. The project was the transformation of the former Wyomissing Knitting Mills Building #5, a structure with a rich history that spans decades. Both Stratix Systems and D&B Construction recognized the significance of preserving the building’s heritage and set out to maintain its integrity and historical value while infusing it with modern amenities and state-of-the-art infrastructure.

As part of the renovation, the project team meticulously removed the entire interior to create a blank canvas for a modern and functional layout. The exterior facade was carefully restored to its framing, achieving a seamless architectural blend between the existing structure and new additions. The renovations also included the addition of a new north lobby entrance, featuring a stunning five-story glass-enclosed staircase, two elevators, and a dedicated service elevator for maneuvering their expansive business systems products.

A key focus of the project was upgrading the building’s infrastructure to meet modern standards, including plumbing, electrical, mechanical, and sprinkler services. This included robust networking capabilities to support the technological requirements of the IT company. The interior design created several open-concept spaces that encourage creativity and productivity, integrating comfortable breakout areas, spacious meeting rooms, and flexible workspaces.

One of the major highlights of this renovation was the transformation of the former low roof area into a magnificent 9,000 square foot office space with soaring 26-foot high ceilings. This not only maximized usable space but also flooded the area with natural light and provided breathtaking views of the surroundings. 

This recognition from the GRCA serves as a testament to D&B Construction’s unwavering commitment to delivering excellence in the field of construction. The transformation of the Stratix building has played an integral role in the broader revitalization efforts of the Greater Reading area, breathing new life into a formerly vacant building, and adding to the allure of the region as it reclaims its historical significance.

We are extremely proud of this recognition. We took an existing building and transformed it from a compartmentalized floor plan into open office areas and functional workspaces while preserving the original design of this historic building. It ties in perfect with the recent redevelopment and revitalization of the former Knitting Mills and Vanity Fair properties.

Andrew Kraft | Project Manager & Team Supervisor

About D&B Construction:

Founded in 2010 by Dan Gring and Brennan Reichenbach, D&B Construction has grown into one of the region’s most trusted construction firms. Headquartered in Reading, Pennsylvania the company is driven by a commitment to quality and transparency. They have grown from the two founding members to over 50 employees with an additional office outside of Philadelphia to conveniently serve the Delaware Valley region. Today they are a full-service construction management firm offering a variety of services to commercial clients in the healthcare, multi-family, professional office, retail / hospitality, institutional, and industrial sectors. Delivering an individualized, superior experience to all of our clients, D&B is a team of genuinely good people who love to build and work hard, with their success built upon long-standing relationships anchored in honesty, trust, and fairness. Leveraging vast design and build experience, D&B is the conduit for business owners, corporations, and developers looking to enhance the places in which they work, grow, and invest. Completing projects safely, within budget, and on time to minimize any disruption to business is always top priority. For more information, visit online at: dbconstructiongrp.com.

Thursday, October 26, 2023 – D&B Construction Group, a leading commercial construction company, is thrilled to announce that our exceptional work on the Reading Orthodontic Group project has received recognition at the Building Berks Awards, organized by the Greater Reading Chamber Alliance (GRCA). We are honored to have been acknowledged in the category of “Commercial Renovation” for our transformative efforts on this healthcare architectural masterpiece.

The Building Berks Awards, hosted by GRCA, serves as a platform to celebrate innovation, economic growth, and development through construction projects in Greater Reading, Pennsylvania. This recognition for our Reading Orthodontic Group project underscores our unwavering commitment to excellence and our dedication to the communities we serve.

In the heart of Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, the Reading Orthodontic Group building represented a remarkable transformation that redefined the essence of healthcare architecture. A former financial institution was meticulously transformed into a vibrant realm of healing, where modern medical excellence seamlessly blended with architectural innovation. 

The renovation was an orchestration of transformation, with careful deconstruction, reimagination of spaces, and attention to detail. Notable features include a 28-foot-high glass curtain wall at the entryway, natural light flooding the interior, an open ceiling concept, exposed ductwork, suspended lighting fixtures, and acoustic considerations, all contributing to a harmonious and soothing atmosphere.

The Reading Orthodontic Group project has not only set a precedent for transformative architecture but has also become a cornerstone in the Wyomissing community, symbolizing growth, revitalization, and community pride. As patients step into the facility, they experience care, empathy, and innovation in a space that bridges the past with the future.

D&B Construction Group extends its heartfelt appreciation to the Greater Reading Chamber Alliance for this recognition and to our dedicated team for their exceptional work in bringing this transformative project to life. We are committed to continuing to set new standards in construction excellence and innovation in the communities we serve.

We are honored to be recognized by the Greater Reading Chamber Alliance for our work on ROG’s Wyomissing location. This recognition is a testament to the entire team's dedication and unwavering focus on quality. Starting with the owners to the designers and our pre-construction and construction teams, everyone worked tirelessly to deliver this iconic building in the heart of Wyomissing.

Drew Bell, VP of Business Development

About D&B Construction:

Founded in 2010 by Dan Gring and Brennan Reichenbach, D&B Construction has grown into one of the region’s most trusted construction firms. Headquartered in Reading, Pennsylvania the company is driven by a commitment to quality and transparency. They have grown from the two founding members to over 50 employees with an additional office outside of Philadelphia to conveniently serve the Delaware Valley region. Today they are a full-service construction management firm offering a variety of services to commercial clients in the healthcare, multi-family, professional office, retail / hospitality, institutional, and industrial sectors. Delivering an individualized, superior experience to all of our clients, D&B is a team of genuinely good people who love to build and work hard, with their success built upon long-standing relationships anchored in honesty, trust, and fairness. Leveraging vast design and build experience, D&B is the conduit for business owners, corporations, and developers looking to enhance the places in which they work, grow, and invest. Completing projects safely, within budget, and on time to minimize any disruption to business is always top priority. For more information, visit online at: dbconstructiongrp.com.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “the share of construction workers who are women is at an all-time high and has steadily increased since 2016.” The Washington Post has found that as of August, 14% of all workers in the industry are women. (The last time this number was this high was in October of 2009 when they made up 13.5% of workers).

 

 

In October of 2022, the U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Gina Raimondo, announced the Million Women in Construction Initiative while speaking at the North American Building Trades Union’s Tradeswomen Build Nations Conference. The goal is to double the number of women in construction from one million to two million over the next 10 years.

Despite this positive news, a recent survey revealed that both women and underrepresented groups tend to leave construction at a higher rate. This study was completed as a way to solve the talent retention dilemma being seen across the industry. (Some background: In May of 2022, the Associated General Contractor of America (AGC) recorded the “highest number of construction job openings since the turn of the century.” Simultaneously, the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which showed that construction employees are quitting at twice the rate of layoffs or discharges. This trend has been consistent for the last 16 months).

 

 

You can view the full report analyzing the data collected from this survey here!

This past Wednesday, Procore hosted a webinar called “The Data on Diversity and Women in Construction.” Members of Team D&B attended to uncover reasons behind the industry’s retention problem and also celebrate the significant milestones in representation. One of the speakers in attendance was Betsy Bagley, Co-Founder and Director of Pulsely, an organization that helps companies measure and monitor the progress of their DEI efforts and the impact it has on business performance. She pointed out how the study revealed that “yes, everyone wants career advancement and better pay, but inclusion is also a driving factor that the typical woman was likely to attribute to their reason on deciding to leave the industry. Far more women agree that inclusion is a challenge that plays a role in them deciding to leave the industry.”

A University of Maryland study published in October 2022 shed light on the visible gender imbalance in construction. It revealed that “54 percent of women who achieve leadership roles in construction have advanced degrees, compared to just 31 percent of men. Additionally, women typically work for 56 percent more companies and hold 19 percent more job titles than their male counterparts.” These disparities clearly illustrate the additional steps women are often forced to take to advance their careers.

In order to continue the trend of increasing women in construction and showing women that they already have a place on job sites, it is important that we collectively make change happen. In the webinar provided by Procore, Pulsely’s Co-Founder and Director, Betsy Bagley, noted that “people working in the industry are committed to the industry. They just want to see change from their employers.” Today’s workforce wants organizations to take it a step beyond just addressing how inclusion looks. They want companies to meaningfully address how inclusion feels.

 

 

 

Here’s Some Ways To Get The Job Done:

-Companies can enroll their female employees into their local chapter for The National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), which provides professional development, networking, education, leadership training and more to women throughout the Nation. There are 118 NAWIC chapters across America for women in the industry to get involved in. You can learn more about the history of this organization, as well as resources for women by heading to our #WICweek blog from last year.

-Boost innovation by boosting inclusion. Inclusion matters not only for obvious reasons, but it can also affect a company’s bottom line. According to a BCG study, companies with higher levels of diversity get more revenue from new products and services.” Likewise, a study by McKinsey revealed that “companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 21% more likely to experience above-average profitability than companies in the fourth quartile.”

-Hold people accountable for behavior that is less than inclusive or inadequate. Visible Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – or DEI leadership – that shows commitment to the priorities of DEI goes a long way.

-Offer more structured career development and be more deliberate and intentional about offering fair career development for everyone.

 

The future of construction will heavily be defined by how our industry addresses the inequities discussed in this article. At D&B Construction, we believe that empowering all of our employees to feel included so they know their company is committed to their continued success is vital not only for our continued success as an organization, but our collective success as an industry.

 

 

A Q&A With The Ladies Of D&B:

We asked some of the women on Team D&B to offer their insight. See what they had to say below! You can view other features from years past here and here on our blog.

 

Meet Jessica Nelis, Director of Operations –

 

Number of Years in the Industry: 15

How She First Got Started in the Industry:

“I started by taking drafting, engineering and art classes in high school and went to college to major in design.  After college, I worked as a designer at an architecture firm and then switched into project management.”

 

Q: Is this industry one you always wanted to be involved in?

A: “I first started to consider design & construction in high school, although I wasn’t exactly sure which specific path within the industry I wanted to take. I enjoyed both art and science throughout high school and thought this industry was the perfect crossroads of left brained and right brained thinking. I am intrigued by the concept of an idea coming together in a practical and aesthetic way to solve a problem with a tangible and lasting result.”

 

Q: What do you love most about your job and why?

A: “What I love most about my job is the continual growth – both for the company and me personally.  D&B has been on a steep growth trajectory since I started here 5 ½ years ago. When I was hired, there were only 15 employees so everyone wore many hats. I worked as both an estimator and project manager in residential and commercial construction. I was exposed to many different project types and facets of the business. My diverse experience throughout a variety of departments and divisions provided me with a unique perspective and position to support the company with first-hand knowledge of our systems and processes.”

               

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “I love being involved in an industry that is so critical to people’s lives. Buildings are essential to communities and families. They’re where we live, learn and conduct business on a daily basis.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? How do women add value to this male-dominated industry?

A: “Women add value because they offer a unique perspective.  Studies show women tend to be more web thinkers than men so being able to connect the dots across the big picture is helpful in STEM based industries such as construction.”

               

Q: If you could go back and tell your younger self one piece of advice that you know now, what would it be?

A: “Don’t overthink it or second guess yourself; just do it… with confidence!”

               

Q: Do you feel there is now more women in the field compared to when you first began in the industry? Why / why not?

A: I am encouraged to hear more young girls are entering STEM related fields, which gives me hope for the future! It’s a great field to consider for women – studies show the pay gap is smaller in construction than most other industries.

 

 

Meet Rachel Hope, Office Coordinator –

 

Number of Years in the Industry: 2

Q: Is this industry one you always wanted to be involved in?

A: “I never pictured myself working in the construction industry (administration side), and I was nervous changing my medical career to this industry but I could not be happier I made this move. I have learned so much in the last two years, and I am thankful for the time our team has taken to answer and teach me everything and anything I need to know about construction.”

 

Q: What do you love most about your job and why?

A: “Being the point of contact and keeping the office running as smooth as possible for everyone to work efficiently with office supplies and have necessities at hand. Also, I am so happy to learn how marketing works, help to schedule meetings for the team, and volunteer in our community when time allows. I’m so happy to be part of such a great team.”

 

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “I love seeing the before and after of finished projects. I am amazed how one day I am driving past a cornfield and a year later seeing families living in houses, making memories in that same spot. Everybody has such an important job to make these projects a reality.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? How do women add value to this male-dominated industry?

A: “Women in the construction industry bring a lot to the table. We were born multi-taskers, we can balance and juggle duties, and we have great organizational skills. Women need to build one another up and help one another succeed in this career.”

 

 

Meet Anna Velinsky, Estimator –

Number of Years in the Industry: 18

How She First Got Started in the Industry:

“My dad was a structural engineer, and as a kid I always saw him at the draftsman table. I think my first ‘construction’ drawings were plans I drew for a bird house at the age of 5 sitting next to him at that huge table with weird arms and rulers. It fascinated me.”

 

Q: What do you love most about your job and why?

A: “Every project is as unique as the people who the project is going to serve. It is never boring.”

 

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “Making a dream of a building become a reality. You are part of creating something that people use and everyone can see and appreciate.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? 

A: “Despite it being a male dominated industry I’m not treated any differently and respected for my abilities. I find it’s a very meritocratic industry where anyone can succeed no matter what gender they are. There’s a true equality in opportunity for women. I’m proud to be a part of it.”

 

Q: How do women add value to this male-dominated industry? 

A: Women have natural abilities to be detail oriented and good at multi-tasking.

 

Q: If you could go back and tell your younger self one piece of advice that you know now, what would it be?

A: “Be confident in your abilities. The world is full of possibilities. Go for it!”

 

Q: What advice would you give to women looking to enter the industry?

A: “The industry will always require qualified and talented people. There’s no better time to consider construction industry as a very rewarding career choice.”

 

Q: Do you feel there is now more women in the field compared to when you first began in the industry? Why / why not?

A: “Yes, I see a lot more women in all construction related professions. Women are attracted to rewarding long term careers where they can be financially successful.”

 

 

 

 

Meet Melany Eltz, Commercial Project Coordinator –

Number of Years in the Industry: 1

How She First Got Started in the Industry:

“My involvement in the construction industry first started when working for a retail store fixture manufacturing company. How something starts as a paper drawing and ends up as a complete fixture in a certain amount of time amazed me.”

 

Q: Is this industry one you always wanted to be involved in?

A: “Not at first. I wanted to be involved in the pharmaceutical science industry and changed my interest to marketing and business management. From there, I landed in the manufacturing industry, which then lead me to the construction industry which I didn’t realize would be so exciting!”

 

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “There is a lot of variety which keeps it interesting, and I am always learning something new.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? How do women add value to this male-dominated industry?

A: “I’ve always considered myself a strong woman in a man’s world. It is a good feeling to be accepted in this industry as a woman, and I am proud to be working together with men. Women are naturally adept at reasoning and listening, which I feel is integral to building good relationships and trust with workers, contractors, and vendors. I also feel women add value by staying more organized.”

 

Q: If you could go back and tell your younger self one piece of advice that you know now, what would it be?

A: “Never be afraid of trying anything new; keep your head up and persevere.”

 

Q: What advice would you give to women looking to enter the industry?

A: “In any industry, be confident in yourself, respect those who are more knowledgeable and learn from them. You’ll eventually gain their respect as well.”

 

 

 

Meet Maddie, Construction Intern –

Number of Years in the Industry: 1

How She First Got Started in the Industry:

“My first experience in the construction industry is now with D&B through my internship. I chose this internship opportunity because it would give me insight into all of the different occupations, and I get to see the different types of employees that work together in the construction process.”

 

Q: Is this industry one you always wanted to be involved in?

A: “I knew that I wanted to be involved in either the engineering or architectural side of the construction process since middle school, but it has only been this year through my internship with D&B that I decided I want to go into residential architecture.”

 

Q: What do you love most about your internship and why?

A: “I love that I get to see the construction and on-site side of the design process because I will see less of this side of the industry in college and once I start my career as an architect. However, I still need to understand this side of the process to be successful, so this experience is very valuable.”

 

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “My favorite thing about the industry is how many people of different job types and backgrounds get to work together in one company or on one project to make the process run smoothly.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? How do women add value to this male-dominated industry?

A: “I am proud to be a woman in this industry because it is an accomplishment to be able to thrive in a male-dominated industry – especially being younger. I believe women provide a different perspective to the industry and bring new and successful ideas.”

 

Q: What advice would you give to other women looking to enter the industry?

A: “I would tell them to be confident. Even when they may not think so, they belong here and should stand up for themselves. Always ask questions because you can always learn from others around you.”

 

 

Meet Angela Cremer, Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Number of Years in the Industry: 2.5

 

Q: How did you first join the industry? Is construction something you always wanted to be involved in?

A: “I found myself in this industry as a result of COVID-19. Prior to this, I worked on the corporate marketing team of Boscov’s, a large retail department store. When the pandemic hit, we were laid off and thus my job search began. I never really set out to join the construction industry. When I joined D&B, I had not previously worked for a construction company and had little construction knowledge. I had done marketing, PR, and branding for a variety of other industries, from restoration and retail to many nonprofits, so it was a learning curve – and one I’ve thoroughly enjoyed. I regularly am going on jobsites to document the progress, so in the last two years I’ve become more confident in my knowledge through OSHA training provided by D&B and just gaining the experience that comes with time.”

 

Q: What do you love most about your job and why?

A: “I find the responsibility of marketing a construction company fun and rewarding. It is such a neat process to document a job from start to finish.”

 

Q: What do you love most about the industry and why?

A: “There’s so much that goes into a construction project before mobilization happens and before boots even hit the ground. I love being part of the ins and outs of this process and seeing our team create new buildings or breathe new life into old buildings throughout our community is gratifying.”

 

Q: Women make up only about 10.9% of all workers at a construction site in the U.S. What makes you proud to be a woman working in this male-dominated industry? How do women add value to this male-dominated industry?

A: “I’m proud of the women in this industry because they are breaking glass ceilings every day. There’s research and data that prove a positive correlation between companies with a more gender diverse leadership team and profitability. I think that tells you everything you need to know about how women add value to a male-dominated industry.”

 

Q: How can male leaders within the industry empower their female colleagues?

A: “By evaluating a woman’s job performance by the one relevant factor – her work product. How she looks or dresses or other personal factors should not play a role. Simply treating women as equals in the field goes a long way. I recently completed volunteer work with co-workers that involved installing cabinets to renovate a nonprofit’s kitchen. As an office worker, I wasn’t treated differently than my male co-workers in the field. They were all willing to teach me the proper way to use certain tools and offer insight without judgement so I could gain hands-on construction experience.”

 

Q: What advice would you give to other women looking to enter the industry?

A: “A recent article I read stated: ‘For women, advancing in the AEC industry generally means having to climb career ladders with more rungs than men of similar status.’ Don’t let the visible gender imbalance in construction stop you from achieving your goals. Instead, use it as fuel to light your fire. The view from the top once you break the glass ceiling will taste that much sweeter since you worked so hard to get there.”

As developers review new construction projects, a recurring decision must be made in the early stages of development: Should the project be design-bid-build or design-build? These are the two primary delivery methods utilized in the industry, both of which have benefits and weaknesses. We’ve taken the time to review what differentiates the two so you can understand them better.

 

Design-Bid-Build

This process is selected most commonly when pricing is the major driving force behind the decision, as the low bid usually wins. The delivery method starts by taking a project to a design team (which is comprised of consultants, architects and engineers) to create a set of documents that can be used to solicit bids from construction companies. Once design documents are completed the project is put out to bid in a process that is usually managed by the Architect or an owner representative. The objective of the bid process is to solicit the lowest price from a construction company for the specified work. Once the lowest bidder is identified, the owner will then enter into a contract to build what was designed. You can learn more about this process here on our website.

 

 

Design-Build

The Design-Build process utilizes one construction company to oversee all steps of the project from design to completion. This delivery method creates a turn-key solution for developers, as it can be customized to meet the needs of the developer. Developers can tailor what their Design-Builder will manager in the process from property acquisition and municipal approvals, to all design documents, submittals and construction. This framework provides a lot more freedom to developers who may be working on several projects at once. You can learn more about this process here on our website.

 

 

So which is the best delivery method?

Both Design-Build and Design-Bid come with their fair share of pros and cons. Next, we’ll review those pluses and minuses to see if there’s a clear winner. 

Benefits of Design-Bid:

Cost: Design-Bid is most often used when your project has a fixed budget. This process elicits the most competitive proposals from competent builders.

Control: In this delivery method owners have much clearer control over pricing, design, and approvals.

Transparent: Design-Bid captures a client’s upfront wants and needs.

If you ask D&B Construction’s Project Executive, Jim Aylmer, he’ll tell you that he prefers Design-Bid-Build for larger projects because it “creates an accurate pricing exercise as it relates to a client’s budget, it allows time for value engineering and more cost-effective budgeting, and the end product is mapped out.” Whenever he has been involved with Design-Build projects they have been for smaller-scale projects, as these designs tend to be more simplified and there is more involvement from the owner throughout the build process.

Negatives of Design-Bid:

Disputes and Delays: When you do a competitive bid process you will only get pricing on exactly what is on your drawings. If your design team misses anything on the construction documents that were used for the bid, you will often end up with finger-pointing in the field and costly change orders.

Time: It can take a long time to organize a design team, create documents, put the project out to bid, go through rebidding and post-bid value-engineering, identify a contractor, and enter into agreements all before you get a shovel in the ground.

Disjointed: Due to the number of disconnected parties in a Design-Bid construction project, you may encounter communication issues as the owner, designers and builder, along with their trades, all act independently, worried about covering their own portions of the project instead of the entirety.

Drawbacks of Design-Build:

Non-competitive: The non-competitive nature of this process doesn’t result in a lowest cost proposal from multiple bids.

Trust: Due to the amount of control a developer is giving up to the Design-Builder, you need to have a lot of trust in the team you’ve selected.

Benefits of Design-Build: 

Efficiency: Consolidating the entire process in one entity allows the most coordination throughout the entire construction process from design to completion. The simplification of design-build allows developers to focus on multiple projects at once.

Customization: This delivery method is great for projects that are unique in finishes and structures. Linking the construction and design teams from the beginning ensure constructability with real-time cost adjustments. This allows owners to effectively manage budgets before breaking ground.

Flexibility: Both to the budget and final end product

Value-Engineering: Throughout the process, developers can monitor and adjust various components of the design for substantial equivalents that can save time and money during construction.

Enhanced Communication: Having one central decision entity (the design-builder) allows for free flow of information from the start of a project. All trades, designers, and owners are communicating through the contractor, which ensures unified messaging and vision through one cohesive team.

Tim Cox, President and CEO of Meister-Cox Architects, emphasizes how he “really likes how it is a team effort when doing design-build projects,” explaining that in these types of projects he works with D&B, the client, and at some point will bring in the subcontractors if they are going to do the design and the drawings for the mechanicals, electrical, and plumbing systems. “It’s a give and take and just part of the value-engineering process really, he explains.”

Timing: Utilizing a design-build approach provides a project that is well scheduled and designed before the start of the construction. Having an early jump on a project’s components allows the builder to coordinate the trades further in advance. This allows the various stages of active construction to flow seamlessly.

 

Can We Declare An Ultimate Winner?!

In short, both construction delivery methods have their significance. As it is with any construction project, what you end up going with ultimately depends on your final usage. Timing and cost are generally the prevailing guidelines for making this decision.  Ultimately, when choosing between Design-Build or Design-Bid a careful analysis of your needs and the points mentioned above should be considered in order to determine the best option for your project.

Jim, our Project Executive, typically would recommend Design-Bid projects for “any and all out of the ground projects.” The reason being? “The client and design team already have the plan in place. We as the construction team then need to execute based off of these design documents,” he explains. Kennett Pointe, Butler Square Apartments, Veterinary Emergency Group, Griswold Home Care, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Souderton ambulatory building are recent examples of Design-Bid jobs that he has played a vital role in.

“Typically, major developers will not likely be performing a project based off of Design-Build. If I had to choose, I would 99% steer a client in the direction of Design-Bid-Build,” he concludes.

 

Food For Thought:

-If you had to choose one over the other, which would you lean towards and why?

-Are there any pros / cons you would add to the list for either construction method?

We’d love to hear your thoughts on the above questions! Feel free to provide your feedback in the comment section below.

If you’d like to discuss what is right for your next project, we’d be glad to talk it through with you in more detail. Reach out to us today to learn more.

While it may be a timeless running joke that those working in construction are incapable of passing by a location they played a role in constructing without saying “I helped build that,” it also is a testament to all the heart, dedication and grit that goes into the industry.

If you are local to the Wyomissing area, you’ve likely heard – and are excited for – the new lifestyle retail center and outdoor promenade that will be opening this Spring. Leading the build is D&B Construction, a locally based full-service commercial construction company that has been trusted as the General Contractor by Project Developer, Brickstone Realty.

The project team behind the build is the definition of construction that cares. It is composed of a talented design team, D&B’s pre-construction team, D&B’s field team of Superintendents and Project Managers, and nearly 35 qualified companies that D&B trusts as an extension of their team as their Trade Partners. Collectively, they have been working tirelessly to juggle strained lead times, supply issues and more to keep the project running smoothly.

D&B Team Members lead the weekly Trade Partner touchbase meeting at Wyomissing Square to keep the job moving smoothly. Representatives from the following Trade Partners attend: Denny's Electric, HC Quality Doors, RF Power Ventilation Inc., Quality Plumbing Solutions, Security First Inc., and Paramount Contracting.

Team D&B started working with the original plans from 2008/2009, which were “cost prohibitive for the project to work from an economics standpoint,” according to Mark Keever, D&B’s Vice President of Pre-Construction. Mark and his department got to work value engineering the project and running through different design recommendations and ideas courtesy of Project Architect, Tim Cox, President and CEO of Meister-Cox Architects based in Wyomissing. These efforts allowed the project to move forward in a post-COVID world by making it more affordable to construct without losing character and style so the project could be successful for all involved.

“Anytime you are working with a building of that age and size, there will always be challenges and unforeseen conditions. D&B’s Pre-Construction Department, along with the Developers, Design Team and Trade Partners did a deep dive into the required due diligence for a project of this magnitude. Due to the upfront legwork, we were able to head off any major hurdles or obstacles before they arose,” reflects Mark.

Many of the individuals involved in this project have a motivation fueled not only by their dedication to the craft, but their personal ties to the community and love for the area. For D&B Team Member Josh Mazzo, who is also the Project Manager on the job, this rings true. “I grew up in the area, moved away, and came back. There’s something unique about Wyomissing, and to be able to have the opportunity to make physical imprints on the area means a lot. I brag about it to my family and friends. The excitement in my voice will tell you all you need to know,” he explains.

Such is also the case for Project Architect, Tim Cox. As a Wilson High School grad who still lives in the area, it has been “an honor to be part of a project that revitalizes the area, and it is truly humbling to be able to make a small contribution and an indelible mark in the history of Wyomissing.” Similar to how native Berks Countians will always remember the legacy of the Vanity Fair complex, Cox hopes that this transformation of the former Brickstone’s and Viva Bistro and Lounge will also “cement its place into the hearts and history of generations to come.”

 

John Connors, Principal / Master Developer for Brickstone, is confident that the 12 tenants moving into this space will do just that and become “Wyomissing’s living room.” He explains how the intention was always for this to be a first-class best in show lifestyle retail center. “That’s been our plan all along, and that’s what we’re getting. A nice mix of high quality national, regional, and local folks with tenants like Sola Salons and Vintner’s Table by Folino Estate Winery,” states Connors.

To learn more about spaces still available for lease, contact Brickstone Realty directly or reach out through their retail broker, MSC Realty.

From rendering to reality: All images below on the left are renderings courtesy of Tim Cox of Meister-Cox Architects. All images on the right were taken on-site in mid-February showing the progression. You can view more photos throughout construction here on our website.

Choosing Wyomissing:

The developer of this project, Brickstone Realty, has been in the large-scale rehabilitation business for many years in center-city Philadelphia. According to John Connors, when they saw this property – which was not only a very large warehouse building, but also 13 acres in the heart of Wyomissing’s Borough – it looked like a terrific opportunity for them to do a large multi-use project. They wanted to bring high quality retail right into the neighborhood so locals no longer have to get into their car to seek such services out.

“We think it’s going to be an outstanding market, and the response we’re getting now from tenants is really extraordinary. We could have taken shortcuts and filled this place up with Class B tenants, but we basically promised the Borough of Wyomissing something great. We think that this has been an extraordinary development and probably the catalyst for all the other development that’s followed. It’s been successful in every way: 248 apartments upstairs, 135 hotel rooms, another 100 apartments immediately contiguous, The Knitting Mills right next door. We expect this retail to be equally, and maybe even more so, successful. We think the new center of gravity for Wyomissing Borough is going to switch to right here, as we’ve tried to capture the best of everything there is to offer and deliver it right here,” explains Connors.

The Course of Construction:

In the late Summer of 2022, D&B Construction began demolition on this project. The beginning stages involved a lot of lead abatement work and demolition, including excavation and exporting approximately 1.5′ of existing material throughout the 30,000 square foot building footprint in order to lower the subgrade to achieve the desired finished floor elevation. It involved coordinating the removal of approximately 250 tri-axle loads of dirt from the interior of the building.

The construction schedule of this project was an aggressive one, but Team D&B credits each and every one of their Trade Partners for going above and beyond to keep the schedule and maintain the level of product D&B expects. Josh echoes these thoughts, explaining how the D&B team has been “working diligently with our Trade Partners to find ‘work arounds’ until we are able to land the equipment needed, as lead times are a huge issue in today’s world.”

Although it is the first time that Brickstone has worked with D&B Construction, John Connors credits Team D&B for having a good working relationship with the developer and “getting what we wanted to accomplish early on.” Connors explains how D&B and Brickstone have been working hand-in-hand for over 20 months now thanks to “a couple of pandemic-induced fits and starts.”

While no developer enjoys a value-engineering exercise, John Connors believes they were extremists coming out of the pandemic in every respect, so they had to deal with the realities of what the market place was. “I think all in all we worked together to get the best possible result given the conditions of the market place right now. We’re happy with our design. We’re happy with where it’s going. We’re looking forward to opening this place up in the Spring and making a difference in Wyomissing Borough and Berks County,” concludes Connors.

If you drive down Hill Avenue in Wyomissing today, you’ll see storefronts are nearly all installed behind the recognizable navy blue and white fence screening that is D&B’s. This is a pivotal turning point for the project because not only does the installation of all storefronts look nice, but it also allows heat to be kept in the suites so various interior work can be completed. While the exterior is being prepped for more earthwork changes with the promenade and retaining wall, drywall is being finished inside each future tenant’s space so painting can begin and permanent power and heat can be delivered to each unit.

 

 

“We have a good team working on this project – From the Trade Partners, to the owner, to the D&B Project Team. It’s been a team effort the whole way through, and you will want to stick around to see the final product this team can produce,” concludes Josh.

That’s the difference of a construction company that cares.

Stay tuned, Wyomissing. Stay tuned.

How Jay First Got Involved in Construction:

If you ask our Construction Supervisor, Jay, he’ll describe his exposure to construction throughout his youth as “generic,” noting that he would help his Dad or Grandfather build a shed, do deck repairs, or other things along those lines.

As time marched on, Jay “was confronted by a couple different opportunities to get into the business, and that kind of turned into a little bit more high-end trim carpentry, cabinetry, built-ins, libraries, things along those lines.” He defines his journey as kind of going backwards. “I started from the fine stuff and moved back into framing and things of the like instead of the natural progression where you would typically start on a framing type of issue or drywall hanging issue and progress into some of the finer stuff.” Jay’s experience in high end construction came during his time in New York and New Jersey. He mainly worked in the city in New York, so obviously there wasn’t a lot of room for ground-up construction. “There’s no grass, to be blunt,” he explains, “so we focused more on fit-out jobs – both high-end residential and commercial work.”

He spent quite a few years doing this work in the second to none hustle and bustle that is working in Midtown “before redeveloping, re-upping, and moving into the agriculture end with my company, GreatGrow, which brought us out here to Pennsylvania.”

GreatGrow, which develops soil and plant amendments that increase crop yields, improve soil structure, relieve soil compaction, improve soil oxygen, and promotes the use of water while suppressing foliage and root disease, has since turned into an Intellectual Properties firm, as Jay has been “basically selling his inventions off and things along those lines.”

Jay found himself back in construction – only on the other side of the table – as a Building Code Official and Zoning Officer for Kraft Code Services for six years. “From there, it felt like the natural progression was to move away from that and get back into what I spent so many years doing in New York on the construction side of things,” says Jay.

Jay Meets D&B:

Jay describes himself as a learner and a thinker. Although he had an element of sitework experience in the past, it wasn’t quite to the scale of the multi-family projects that he is leading with D&B Construction. “I like learning new things, so moving into the sitework and infrastructure work and these big parts of the multi-family is very eye-opening and exciting,” he explains.

“I’ve only been with the company for a bit over a year, and I have my hands in a bunch of stuff. I think just with as many moving parts that we have throughout all the different projects, that challenge to keep up with the Joneses and to make everything happen and keep everybody happy that’s pretty much what fuels the fire within me. You wake up and hit the ground running 100 miles an hour all day long.”

 

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Jay Outside of D&B:

His main motivation that gets him out of bed in the morning? His family, of course, which he describes as “the most important part of my existence as a whole.” Jay and his wife have two children: Madeline and McLaen. Although his son is getting ready to go away to college soon and his daughter is about to enter high school – thus making things a lot less busy than when they were much younger – the Holmgren family is still very active.

Madeline is described by her father as a “brilliant dancer,” and McLaen, who played a lot of soccer growing up, has since transitioned over to music in his late teen years – following in his Dad’s footsteps. “He’s picked up a lot of my instruments that I held. Once COVID hit, and I told them they weren’t going to be on their screens 24 hours a day, he started running with it. He’s actually moving more towards playing the bass than the guitar like I did. That love for music has definitely been passed down there. He’s quite the guitarist, quite the bassist,” Jay says with a proud smile. A younger Jay used to write poetry and lyrics, and his son is also following in his footsteps in that regard, too, having put his first couple little pieces together, which Jay describes as “well thought out and well done.”

He describes his daughter, Madeline, as the same with her dance and her art – she draws a lot and things along those lines (just as Jay used to sketch and sculpt a bit).

“I like to think that a lot of the artistic stuff that I did when I was younger was passed down to the youngins,” he explains. Obviously – school’s always important. Jay’s wife, Suzanne, helps the kids with homework as much as possible. “It’s a day to day. You know – we’re just a family,” explains Jay, “but it makes it all worthwhile when you come home to a house full of issues – or not – to keep a smile on your face.”

Finding An Extended Family in D&B:

“I think D&B’s support structure overall is – not to throw the word / term ‘team’ around, but there is such a team structure to D&B. I’ve worked in companies and represented companies in the past where they were very fragmented. Everybody kind of worked on their own keel, not a whole lot of cross over. I do really feel at D&B you have solid relationships. If you need somebody to talk to about this, that or the other, there are people here that are genuinely interested and really nice shoulders to lean on here and there. I try to provide the same, but you know it’s definitely a family feel, a lot of support structure. If people need things, we’re there for each other.”

 

Often times, we are asked “What’s your why?!” Why do you do what you do? What motivates you to get out of bed each morning? What is your calling?

Our Senior Superintendent, Mr. Ruza’s calling was always construction. His dad was a builder, so he got into construction at just 10 years old. This instilled Mr. Ruza’s unparalleled work ethic at a very young age. Growing up, he traded in his summers and weekends at the shore to help out his Dad on the jobsite.

He joined the Local 845 Carpenter’s Union to complete his apprenticeship, and he also attended college for two years to study Architectural Engineering. Mr. Ruza worked as a Carpenter until he left for the Marines to serve in Vietnam. After serving his four years, he soon started working again, and he has been doing it ever since. If you ask Mr. Ruza about his career he’ll give you this simple – yet definite – answer: “It’s in my blood. That’s all I really know how to do.”

Something else you should know about Mr. Ruza? He just might be the definition of grit. He loves a challenge, stating that he’ll “never turn down a challenge when it comes to work.” With a smile, he concludes: “The harder it is, the better I like it.”

 

Another aspect of his calling just may be his commitment to safety. It’s no secret that safety is a huge component of construction day in and day out, but Mr. Ruza goes the extra mile, embodying the D&B way of safety being our standard. In 2013, he worked for a General Contractor that was working for a University in Philadelphia. They had just finished constructing a restaurant that was supposed to open at 5:00, but next thing they knew something broke and they were trying to fix it. There was a hole in the wall that was not properly covered. Mr. Ruza walked across it, fell, and shattered about three inches above his ankle. He spent about 30 days in the hospital and 18 months learning how to walk again. “I always took safety seriously, but after that I really got into it. I’ve been doing it since 2013 as a Health and Safety Officer for different companies. That’s why I’m here as a Senior Superintendent for D&B. My job is to enforce OSHA regulations and safety,” he explains.

As an active member of D&B’s Safety Committee, Mr. Ruza has an OSHA manual on the desk in his job trailer. Here, it does anything but sit and collect dust. He is actively reading it from cover to cover to stay up to date with any changes, and he isn’t afraid to pull someone off his jobsite if they are violating any safety regulations. “I liked working with my hands. Now I’m getting well-seasoned, so now I use my brain and my knowledge. I try to teach anyone that wants to be taught,” he says.

 

For Mr. Ruza it’s all about work and one other important thing – family. After his accident on the jobsite in 2013 he wasn’t sure if he would ever be able to work again. While that in itself was difficult for him, the hardest part of that time in his life was not being able to do things with his two young children.

Today all of his children are grown. His son just bought a house to fix up and rent out, so he’s been going over to help him with that. Otherwise, he lives a simple life. “I leave my job site. I go home, eat, and watch TV. I go to bed early because I get up early. That’s about it. I don’t really take vacations or anything. It’s all about work,” he explains. Mr. Ruza takes so much pride in his work that he has even spent Holiday weekends giving his family a tour of his jobsite. That’s passion for the job.    

 

Mr. Ruza enjoyed spending part of his Easter Sunday giving his kids a tour of the progress taking place at the mixed-use building he is currently overseeing construction of in Kennett Square, PA. That's passion for the job. That's a love for what you do. That's the D&B way. That’s the D&B difference. PS: Dad's a good boss — All PPE was required on the job site, even on a day off from construction because #safetyisourstandard.

 

Labor shortages is a hot topic right now. In the construction industry alone, there are approximately 400,000 job openings. Currently, 67% of construction companies are experiencing skilled labor shortages across the globe. Couple this with an increase in material cost (we’re talking nearly quadruple the cost of plywood wholesale prices from $400 to $1500 per thousand square feet that we saw during the first year of COVID-19) and you have a minor reason to panic.

According to our Chief Operating Officer, Brennan Reichenbach, the cost of construction has doubled – and in some cases nearly tripled – in the last approximate five years alone. The substantially cheaper costs of a fit out vs. ground up construction are all the more reason for a developer to consider adaptive reuse projects over new construction – especially in the current climate.

 

 

As the icing on the cake, mix these two factors together with the dwindling amount of available development space in metropolitan areas, the current housing market and the nation’s housing shortage, and you get the perfect recipe for a high demand in multi-family housing. Despite all of the stressors currently weighing on the millions of people who touch the construction industry in some capacity, when looking at the current climate through the eyes of a developer, it may just be the perfect cocktail for opportunity. Read on to find out how:

 

The Housing Inventory Issue Coupled with Available Development Space:

 

Inventory of houses is an issue across the nation right now. It’s no secret that the prices of reselling a home is at an all-time high, and that is due in part to the fact that new construction is expensive thanks to all the hurdles that need to be jumped in order to reach the finish line of complete construction. A rather stubborn supply chain has been no help in driving down the cost of housing either.

Berks County has been a Seller’s Market since September of 2021, with homes in the county selling for 10.3% more than they would have a year ago. The number of homes for sale in Berks County this year is the highest it has been in the last 15 years. For comparison, in May of this year there were 759 homes on the market throughout the county compared to just 530 the month before. This is an increase of 43.2%.

Gallup’s annual Economy and Personal Finance Poll, conducted in April and published in early May, revealed that 69% of respondents believed it is a bad time to buy a house. This is the first time that a majority of Americans have felt this way in the poll’s 44-year history. The factors likely contributing to this majority statement include rising interest rates and the inability for new housing construction to have a significant impact on the demand for housing.

A recent interview on Keller Williams Realtor Brad Weisman’s podcast Real Estate and You featured Kevin Timochenko, Founder and Owner of Metropolitan Companies, who handles development, building, and management. D&B is currently building a number of multi-family apartments (like The Reserve at Iroquois) for the company, who is also scheduled to build between 200 and 300 single-family homes from Pittsburgh to Delaware within the next year.

Timochenko discusses how developing in Berks County is a different story than the other areas his company typically deals with. Although land is available, it is harder for developers such as Kevin Timochenko to make money on this investment since land and improvement costs are so high in this area, thus making it difficult to build. The amount of preserved land in the area also can complicate things – especially when land is being preserved in the middle of commercial corridors that would better serve the community if developed. To add insult to injury, Berks County is one of the most preserved counties throughout the state of Pennsylvania with over 75,000 acres of preserved farmland.

If you trade the farmland of more rural areas for the concrete of larger cities, you’ll still find the same overarching issue of a lack of available square footage for new development – just in a different setting.

 

So How Do All These Negatives Make A Positive?

The solution may just be repurposing the commercial square footage already available. Currently, society as a whole is seeing more and more real estate developers buying office buildings so they can convert them to residential use. A recent high-profile example was announced in Washington D.C. with plans to convert two older office buildings – Universal North and Universal South – near DuPont Circle on Connecticut Avenue. The buildings, which total 700,000+ square feet, marks Philadelphia-based real estate firm, Post Brothers, debut into the metro Washington D.C. area.

The firm may be onto something, as they found success in redeveloping a former warehouse in Northern Philadelphia into The Poplar, which includes 285 apartments and high-end amenities including a world-class fitness sanctuary rooftop dog parks, and three infinity-edge saltwater pools.

Time will tell how this transition fares, but it looks like many metropolitan areas throughout the country – with our nation’s capital as the main experiment – will be serving as case studies for converting former commercial space into residential housing or even mixed-use development. In an article in the Washingtonian, Senior Editor Marisa M. Kashino was told by John Falcicchio, Washington D.C.’s Deputy Mayor for Planning and Development, that adaptive reuse is needed to “save downtown.” In the metro D.C. area alone, approximately 325,000 units need to be added before the end of the decade in order to keep up with the demand. Many have their eyes on the recently estimated 157.9 million square feet of rentable office space in the D.C. area as a potential solution for this issue.

 

The Push for Office-to-Residential Conversions

Many other metropolitan areas aside from Washington D.C. are seeing a strong push for adaptive reuse projects focused on converting office space to residential multi-family living – so much so that legislators are even passing laws to assist with this trend. The latest budget for California included a call to action to spend $400 million “as an incentive to developers to convert commercial and office buildings into affordable housing in the budget years 2022-23 and 2023-24.” In early June New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed a bill that made it easier to convert underused hotels into permanent housing. Just last week, city officials in Chicago announced that they would provide tens of millions of dollars to developers willing to convert aging office towers into residential buildings.

New York City’s push for such conversions is also apparent with the $1.5 billion transformation of the former home of Irving Trust Bank at One Wall Street in lower Manhattan, marking itself as the largest office-to-residential conversion in the city’s history. Take a detour west to Salt Lake City, and you’ll find Houston-based developer Hines, an international real estate firm, acquired a 24-story office building – South Temple Tower – which they plan to convert into a 255-unit luxury apartment complex starting in early 2023. Similar projects are also in the works in major cities such as Atlanta and Dallas.

 

A Look At The Local Forecast

Given the strong trend of these conversions in larger cities, it is inevitably just a matter of time before we see this start to take hold in more sub-suburban areas.

Patrick Zerbe, Commercial Real Estate Agent for NAI Keystone, has been watching this trend start to take hold since the pandemic. “The pandemic fast-tracked transitions in different trends. The largest transition we are seeing in the commercial real estate world are businesses providing remote and hybrid work. With less people in the office, companies and organizations have determined to decrease their footprint, which in contrast has given an influx of vacant office space. We have primarily seen this in larger cities, but this trend is slowly making its way to subsidiary markets,” he explains.

Recent data from Co-Star, a global leader in commercial real estate intel, provides a good example of what Patrick discusses. Reading, PA has a 6.3% vacancy rate for the nearly 13.5 million square feet of office space available in the city. In comparison, of the 323 million square feet of office space in Philadelphia, 10.3% (or 33 million square feet) is currently vacant. This is an increase from the historical average of 9.5%.

Office rents in the Reading Market were rising at a 1.6% annual rate during the fourth quarter of 2022, and have posted an average annual gain of 1.6% over the past three years. While 260,000 SF has delivered over the past three years (a cumulative inventory expansion of 1.9%), nothing is currently underway. Vacancies in the metro were a bit above the 10-year average as of Q4 of 2022, but were essentially flat over the past four quarters. (Source: Co-Star)
Heading into late 2022, Philadelphia's office market is hitting an inflection point. As the pandemic subsides, tenants are once again making long-term leasing decisions in larger numbers. Since the late last year, total leasing has been averaging about 2.3 million SF quarterly, more than double the lows hit during the first few quarters of the pandemic. Meanwhile, the total amount of space listed as available for lease across the market appears to have peaked around 46.5 million SF, a level it has been holding near over the past 12 months. (Source: Co-Star)

“A lot of companies no longer want to worry about sharing common space, and more people want direct access and direct walk-in space to their offices. A multi-story office building in the center of a city hosts a lot of common areas,” he reflects.

As a commercial real-estate agent, Patrick sees many redevelopment opportunities in the multi-family market. “With the prices of land and material, building anything ground-up is incredibly expensive right now. Any chance a developer may have to look at a re-development project to substitute some of these costs is a winning combination,” he states.

Aside from the obvious solution of breathing new life into corporate complexes as an adaptive reuse project, Patrick predicts that large retail centers and institutions such as old schools may be a great opportunity for development into multi-family housing to aid the housing crisis.

Let us know what areas you think would serve as the perfect adaptive reuse project for multi-family living in the comments below!

World Architecture Day was established by the International Union of Architects (UIA). Architecture is something we consume every day, as it creates the physical environment we live in. It impacts our society and makes up the culture of every community across the globe.

Meet some of the Architectural firms that we are fortunate to regularly partner with here at D&B Construction: 

 

About Meister-Cox Architects:

Meister-Cox Architects provides exceptional customer service. Clients are provided with all services expected from a large firm with the close client contact of a small firm. They like to help with the difficult projects and will take on the projects that other firms may not.

How has Meister-Cox Architects grown and evolved since being founded in 1974?

The firm was founded by Bill Meister, one Architect, one Drafter, and a Secretary who worked on small commercial projects, elderly housing and multi-family projects. They have steadily grown over the years, with four architects, one designer, and an office operations manager as of 2022. Hospitality projects, industrial projects, and larger commercial projects have enhanced their portfolio. Since 2019, the firm has gone back to their roots by adding several multi-family housing projects to their experience. Their client base is built largely through repeat business, and most of their work is received through referrals.

What type of projects does Meister-Cox tend to specialize in?

Multi-Family Housing, Hospitality, Industrial / Commercial, Places of Worship, Township Buildings, and Daycares.

On average, the firm completes this many projects in a year:

79

Out of all the projects Meister-Cox has completed together as a firm, they are collectively most proud of the following:

They are most proud of their partnership on the design of Dekalb Pike and Virginia Drive. These projects were a natural extension of their hospitality and multi-family experience and have allowed them to expand their portfolio in new and exciting directions. Through these projects they were able to express a contemporary architectural vernacular style and have challenged their team to create affordable, beautiful communities in which to live. Meister-Cox is thankful to be part of the team that will bring them to fruition, and they look forward to many more years of a successful partnership with D&B Construction.

Some other projects Meister-Cox is teaming up with D&B on include active construction on Wyomissing Square and multi-family projects currently in pre-construction, such as Milford Ponds and The Lofts at Fort Washington. Lastly, it’s always worth mentioning this awesome office and showroom they completed for Kountry Kraft Custom Cabinetry.

About Olsen Design Group Architects:

Olsen Design Group Architects is a firm of qualified and experienced professionals who are committed to excellence and who understand the importance of each individual client.  Their office location allows them to comfortably serve the geographical area of southeastern Pennsylvania and the northeastern United States.  It also gives them the ability to be available for an impromptu meeting or site visit to resolve a situation as quickly as possible in order to best serve their clients. Quality and thoughtful aesthetics, attention to detail, and “service after the sale” are what they stand by.

 

How has Olsen Design Group Architects grown and evolved since being founded in 1993?

As they approach their 29th year as a firm, they have lived through 2.5 recessions, the pandemic and a reorganization. They have ‘fine-tuned’ their project methodology to be client-involved from day one. Today they have five full time team members and three “on call” team members as needed.

 

What type of projects does Olsen Design Group tend to specialize in?

Healthcare (hospital based, clinical based, behavioral health and addiction treatment / rehab specialization), Multi-family residential housing, Commercial / Retail and private homes.

The exterior and interior of the DoubleTree Hotel in Reading, PA
GoggleWorks Apartments in Reading, PA
The exterior and interior of the Neag Medical Center in Wernersville, PA at the Caron Foundation

On average, the firm completes this many projects in a year:

20-25

 

Out of all the projects Olsen Design Group has completed together as a firm, they are collectively most proud of the following:

Healthcare. Regardless of the size or the complexity of their healthcare projects, it is most rewarding to assist our clients in planning / designing and building facilities to care for people of all ethnic origins, stations in life, and of all ages to help them live quality lives and improve their conditions.

One such noteworthy healthcare project that Olsen Design Group worked with D&B on was the Penn State Health – St. Joseph renovation in Muhlenberg Township. Here’s a view of the exterior and interior of the building:

 

A medical office fit out for Quest Diagnostics is another healthcare project currently under construction with this architect firm. We’re also huge fans of this well decorated medical office fit out that Team D&B worked with Olsen Design Group for Molly Hottenstein Orthodontics

 

An array of multi-family residential complexes in multiple locations throughout southeastern Pennsylvania also complete Olsen’s portfolio with D&B, including projects locally that are currently under active construction – such as The Reserve at Iroquois, and The Reserve at River’s Edge in Enola, Pennsylvania.

 

About RHJ Associates, P.C.

RHJ Associates, P.C. is a full-service architecture, planning, and design firm with offices in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, and Wilmington, D.E. Established in 1977, they provide comprehensive design services in the commercial, institutional, and private markets. Their continued success correlates directly to the pride they take in their emphasis on communicating, learning, and implementing best practices. This is reflected in the fact that over 95% of their work is from repeat and referral business.

 

What type of projects does RHJ Associates, P.C. tend to specialize in?

RHJ maintains a diverse portfolio of projects including: medical offices, corporate interiors, senior and assisted living facilities, educational facilities, automotive dealerships, car wash facilities, retail and shopping centers, restaurants, fire houses, fitness centers, and private residences.

D&B Construction has had the pleasure of working with RHJ on many projects near and dear to our heart, from the large adaptive reuse project taking place in Wyomissing, PA to make way for Stratix Systems’ future headquarters and our own new headquarters, which was completed in February of 2022.

About Meyer Design Inc.:

Meyer Design Inc. was founded by George Wilson within Meyer Design, Meyer Architects is a Certified Minority Business Enterprise and an award-winning architecture firm that has been recognized across the country for innovative design and contemporary solutions. In 1987 Meyer Architects was launched with a promise to design places of enduring value – 35 years later our passionate architects continue that tradition. We are industry leaders in developing innovative, technology-based solutions that solve complex construction problems and push the boundaries of architecture and design.

What type of projects does Meyer tend to specialize in?

Commercial Architecture, Workplace, Senior Living, Active Adult and Multi-family, Life Science, and Healthcare.

D&B Construction has had the pleasure of working with RHJ on a variety of healthcare projects for well-known clients like Tower Health’s new outpatient office in Womelsdorf, PA and CHOP’s ambulatory medical office in Souderton, PA. We’ve also enjoyed working with Meyer on workplace projects like an 11,200 SF medical office for Griswold Home Care.

About Architectural Concepts, P.C.:

Architectural Concepts, P.C.’s ability to maintain a balance among artistic, technical, and business disciplines embodies their holistic approach to architecture and interior design.  Architectural Concepts is result-oriented with a strong proficiency in creative innovation and technical execution, allowing flexibility in accommodating the needs of their clients.

Their philosophy of client involvement and personalized service is why Architectural Concepts has grown continually since its founding in 1976. Their approach is to form a partnership with their client.  A significant amount of their work is a result of long-term relationships and referrals.  This team approach ensures that the client has an essential, meaningful impact on the design process from concept to completion.

Their mission is to conduct the activities of the firm within the highest ethical standards of the profession; strive to develop a long-term association with their clients by respecting their needs and implementing effective solutions to strengthen this partnership; and contribute to the community to maintain an atmosphere that encourages learning, exploring, and the true enjoyment of architecture.

 

What type of projects does Architectural Concepts P.C. tend to specialize in?

Architectural design, interior design, space planning, furniture design and selection, artwork coordination, site analysis and design, structural engineering, and more for the Corporate, Education, Civic, Athletic / Sports, Hospitality, Multi-Family, Single Family, and Worship sectors.

D&B Construction is currently working with the firm on two multi-family projects, including Village Greens Apartments and Butler Square Apartments for our client, Berger Rental Communities, who we also completed Willowbrook Clubhouse for with this firm.

Alex is a Construction Manager with a 16-year record of success overseeing all phases of large multimillion-dollar construction projects. In addition to completing many multi-family communities for D&B Construction, this includes various other commercial projects, infrastructure, and upscale residential communities.

Backed by strong credentials and a proven history of high-quality project completions, Alex’s success exceling in his work of managing large multi-family construction projects was a result of his Grandpap pushing him to “go on to bigger and brighter things.” Alex’s experience in the industry started at the young age of six years old. His grandparents owned a construction company, and after school he would always want to be dropped off with his Grandpap on the job site. He loved the action of construction.

Alex and his Grandpap over the years
Alex working with his Great Uncle Stanley circa 1993
Alex always enjoyed building and renovating things from a young age
Alex built this bridge over the creek at just 7 years old
This home was build by Alex's Grandpap in Bedford, PA. Alex would often visit and spend time with his Pap while it was being constructed.

Alex continued gaining hands-on experience until he graduated from high school. It was then that his Grandpap encouraged him to go to college. Although Alex wanted to take over his construction company, his Grandpap envisioned the bigger and brighter plans that he is currently fulfilling at D&B.

Alex obtained his Construction Management degree from Penn College. After graduating, he worked for both Ryan Homes and NVHomes building single family and first-time home buyer houses. He was recognized with over 10 awards during his time at NVHomes, one of the top home builders in the nation. “Once I got to that stage it really kind of brought it full circle. I got to interact with so many different homebuyer people and meet them before we even broke ground. Throughout the process we developed a relationship with these guys, and it was so cool to take their dream and turn it into a reality,” explains a grateful Alex with a smile.

His passion for being part of the process of taking “ideas on a napkin” and making it come to life is evident in the smile that crosses his face when he describes why he does what he does for a living. Alex says there is no better feeling than watching this process take place and seeing an idea transition from engineering and architecture to buying ground and taking it vertical.

Alex continues to pass along the lessons and work ethic that Dave, his Grandpap, instilled in him from a young age through his own two sons – Cameron and Liam. They both had great time getting a tour of what a day at work is like for their dad – safely with their PPE and all!

Alex with his wife Michelle and sons Liam and Cameron

If you ask Alex’s wife, Michelle, she’ll tell you how much their sons love helping Alex out with projects around the house. “They always ask to help us, and if they’re not helping they are definitely watching and learning,” explains Michelle. “They’ve used their old gator to help take an old deck down, helped install floors, and they ‘renovated’ the club house attached to their swing set by adding a door, a table, and a pulley system to carry things up and down in a 5-gallon bucket with some help from Alex.”

Michelle could definitely see them following in Alex’s footsteps, just as he did his Grandfather. “Cameron is always building something with his magnet tiles, and Liam always pretend plays by setting up construction sites with his toy trucks and toy tools and acting as the Project Manager,” she says with a smile.

When asked if she thinks Alex still would have worked in the industry had his Grandpap not owned his own construction company, her initial response was no. However, she elaborated to explain that she thinks he still would have done something with his hands – be it a mechanic like his Dad or working in the family’s logging company. “I think he would still have that passion and dedication for great customer service in any career he chose,” she explains.

Alex is on time, if not early, with deadlines. He’s responsive and takes time to explain the building process. I have seen his passion and dedication to his customers continue over the years. We have met many people and made many new friends through his work. I think the fact that people who he’s worked with in the past still keep in touch with him speaks volumes about the passion and dedication Alex has. He just really cares about people and giving them a quality product,” she concludes.

This is why Alex is a great fit for the D&B culture. He has the “We Care” mentality that we call the D&B difference.

It’s no secret that demolition is a big part of the construction process, so we love when the opportunity arises for us to make good use of a property prior to demolition taking place. More often than not, this comes in the form of donating office supplies, such as filing cabinets, that we may find left behind when we get the keys to begin an office fit-out. Most recently, we were able to provide various hands-on training opportunities for Western Berks Fire Department.

 

This was all possible thanks to the thoughtfulness of our Superintendent, Jason Holmgren, and the Vice President of our client, The Commonwealth Group, Don Robitzer. Jason, who has a relationship with the department’s Fire Commissioner, Jared Renshaw, is leading this project on-site day in and day out. It just so happened that Jared was involved in the planning process with the developer awhile back. Jared and Jason were able to connect at the start of the project and coordinated the opportunity for the department to conduct training at the buildings at the former Village Greens golf course in Sinking Spring.

“I was happy and fortunate to be able to bring my past relationship with Western Berks Regional Fire Department in on a D&B project,” explains our Superintendent, Jason. “The training went great! Commissioner Renshaw and his crew were fantastic! We are very lucky to have such a professional department serving the region.”

 

 

Western Berks Fire has answered over 550 calls so far this year, averaging 78 each month and over 1,000 in a year’s time, so this training was invaluable to the department. Both career and volunteer members of the department took advantage of the training opportunity, which took place on multiple occasions over the last few weeks. Those in attendance fine-tuned their skills in the following area: Ground/aerial ladder deployment and placement, deployment and advancement of the 400-foot hose line, cutting garage doors with saws for forcible entry when necessary, and vertical ventilation, which involves using saws to cut through the roof.

“We are always training on these basic, perishable skills, but it’s so much more beneficial to do it at acquired structures, as it makes it more realistic,” explains Commissioner Renshaw. “Hands-on training like this allows us to be able to hone the skills that we will use on fire and other emergency scenes.  We emphasize being proficient in the basics, as they are the building blocks to being great firefighters. The multiple trainings had a great turn out, with 24 people there one evening.

 

“We would like to thank the developer and also D&B Construction for working with us to facilitate this excellent training opportunity,” posted Western Berks Fire Department on their Facebook page.

Western Berks Fire Department was organized and placed in service in 2009. The department serves and protects over 18,000 residents and hundreds of businesses in over 32 square miles throughout Sinking Spring Borough, Wernersville Borough, South Heidelberg Township, and Lower Heidelberg Township. Learn more about their department here, and learn more about what is being constructed at the former Village Greens golf course here on our website.

 

D&B Construction’s partnership with Quality Buildings, a commercial framing contractor, began this year through their work on Kennett Pointe, a ground-up mixed-use property currently under construction in Kennett Square, PA.

Elmer Zook, Founder and President of Quality Buildings, has been part of the industry for 18 years now. “We like expanding our client base as well as building new relationships in the construction industry. D&B came on our radar a few years ago as a fast-growing player amongst other GC’s,” he reflects.

The fruition of Quality Buildings’ relationship with D&B began as a culmination of a handful of work connections, including having known our CEO, Dan Gring, through their involvement at Lancaster Berks Next Gen Construction Connect. At Kennett Pointe they supplied a complete furnish and installed a framing package that included manufacturing of pre-fabricating wall panels, floor and roof trusses and installation of the windows and doors.

“Quality Building produces quality work, and they are easy to communicate with. It is always a pleasure working with them, and I would work with them again in a heartbeat,” says John Ruza, Senior Superintendent overseeing the jobsite in Kennett Square.

About Quality Buildings:

This turnkey framing contractor was founded in 2008 as a home improvement contractor and Agricultural/Equestrian facilities design and build contractor. They’ve built many custom designed horse barns and riding arenas in NY, NJ, DE, MD, and VA.

Having experience in design and build as a contractor, coupled with a desire to work closer to home versus constant traveling, commercial framing seemed to fit well with their philosophy of working together as a team with other trades to deliver a well-planned project. In 2014, their sole focus became commercial framing for multi-family apartments, senior living and hotels. Completing between 12-15 projects annually, the company has an annual gross revenue of $20,000,000+ in the multi-family, senior living and hospitality sectors. Quality Buildings started pre-fabricating wall panels out of their own facility and continued to expand.

Today, Quality Buildings specializes in offsite pre-fabricated building components, as well as framing components, wall panels, floor trusses, roof trusses and all needed equipment and labor for a complete framing system. Offering VE options and full 3D modeling capabilities for clash detection, as well as BIM modeling with other trades, they are acknowledged as a leading innovator in wood framing. They also offer structural engineering and Mass Timber construction. Their commitment to provide customers with the finest craftmanship continues to be their anchor 14 years later. Quality Buildings has an employee count of 42, consisting of VDC designers, project managers, pre-fabricated wall panel manufacturing and field carpenters. They also have a steady base of subcontractors they know they can turn to for their larger projects.

“We pride ourselves for having more attention to detail and a higher level of service than our competition,” explains Elmer. “We are the experts in wood framing and strive to present ourselves as such. Every department within Quality Buildings has an in-depth knowledge of wood framing. Our designers are the linchpin of our projects being successful and have an extensive hands-on experience with building these projects in the field.”

 

                        

 

Q&A With Elmer Zook, Founder and President of Quality Buildings

Q: What’s the best piece of advice you would give to others looking to get into the industry?

A: “Learn as much as you can about the trade you are a part of and about the trades around you that need your collaboration to do a good job and offer a stellar service.  Care about your craft and treat people with respect.”

 

Q: What do you love most about working in the industry and why?

A: “I love working in the industry and providing a service that goes above and beyond just showing up and swinging a hammer. I love that our team is intentional about getting into the nuts and bolts of a project and finding new and better ways to get the job done.”

 

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

A: “We appreciate D&B entrusting QB with being your Framing partner on this project and look forward to many more in the future.”

Doylestown, PA – On Wednesday, June 8 Berger Rental Communities hosted a groundbreaking ceremony to commemorate construction of an additional 50 new residences at their Butler Square property, located at 409 E. Butler Avenue in Doylestown. The company took ownership of the property, which contains 97 units in the first building with commercial retail space below, in the summer of 2021.

 

Breaking ground from left to right: Matt Johnson, Director of Development; CEO Dan Berger; Wayne Everett Vice President of Acquisition & Asset Management; Brennan Reichenbach, Chief Operating Officer of D&B Construction; and Anne-Marie Niklaus, President of Berger Rental Communities

 

The 50 additional apartments being added to the property will feature new one- and two-bedroom layouts. A package room in the lobby brings added convenience to future residents, and charging stations for electric vehicles will be made available to all residents of Butler Square as the company continues to evolve its communities. Efficiency and modernization are also top of mind inside each apartment, where you will find smart home technology that includes locks and thermostats and designer inspired finishes.

 

 

In attendance for the ceremony were members of Berger’s team, current residences of the Butler Square property, the general contractor, D&B Construction, the project architect, Architectural Concepts, PC, Peaceable Street Capital, and members of the New Britain Borough, including Council Vice President Mr. John Wolff Jr. The company was also grateful to have their nonprofit and relief fund Hope & Door, whose mission is to help families in crisis avoid homelessness through rental assistance, in attendance. “Our goal here is not just to provide housing, but to accommodate residents through extreme flexibility, and provide the highest level of customer service,” said the company’s CEO, Dan Berger. The event concluded with a ground breaking to memorialize the day and delicious refreshments from two local food trucks – Local Harvest Pizza and Sweet Pea Ice Cream.

 

Matt Johnson, Director of Development for Berger Rental Communities, speaks during the ground-breaking ceremony

 

Matt Johnson, Director of Development at Berger, sent his appreciation to the New Britain Borough and D&B Construction during the ceremony, stating: “It truly has been a streamlined process thanks to New Britain Borough. Another great partnership we have is with D&B Construction. When we took ownership of Butler Square it was with the hopes that we could further expand the space and bring more residents to the community. With their help that vision is well on its way to becoming a reality.”

This project comes as the company celebrates their 50th anniversary and a year of a tremendous amount of growth, with 50 apartment communities currently under their belt. According to Wayne Everett, Vice President of Acquisitions and Asset Management at Berger Rental Communities, “Through our growth we have been able to combine the personal touch and the entrepreneurial spirit of a smaller company with the sophistication, expertise, and technology of a larger organization.”

Dan Gring, Chief Executive Officer of D&B Construction, commented on the fact that Berger Rental Communities embodies the same core values as the general contractor: “At D&B we make a conscious effort to partner with those who share our ‘we care’ mentality. This extends from everyone to our clients and employees, to our extended team of trade partners and suppliers. Our main core value is ‘People and relationships matter most.’ Upon meeting the Berger team, we instinctively knew they were an organization centered around people just as we are. Their customer-centric approach easily explains why they continue to rank amongst the top in the nation for customer service in multi-family, and D&B is thrilled to be their partner through this continued growth.”

 

D&B Construction Superintendent, Alex, working on the job site. You can see the existing Butler Square Apartments in the distance.

 

About Berger Rental Communities:

Founded in 1972, Berger Rental Communities has been a multi-family owner and operator for 50 years. At nearly 10,000 apartments, they are one of the top five largest management companies in the state of Pennsylvania, with a portfolio that extends into Maryland and Delaware. Berger is motivated by their philosophy that, “renting shouldn’t be hard®”. Their focus on service, innovation and culture has earned them the number one ranking in multi-family for customer service in the nation, and they are frequently rated amongst the top places to work in their industry. For more information on Berger Rental Communities visit rentberger.com.

 

About D&B Construction:

Founded in 2010 by Dan Gring and Brennan Reichenbach, D&B Construction has grown into one of the region’s most trusted construction firms. Headquartered in Reading, Pennsylvania the company is driven by a commitment to quality and transparency. They have grown from the two founding members to over 50 employees with an additional office outside of Philadelphia to conveniently serve the Delaware Valley region. Today they are a full-service construction management firm offering a variety of services to commercial clients in the healthcare, multi-family, professional office, retail / hospitality, institutional, and industrial sectors. Delivering an individualized, superior experience to all of our clients, D&B is a team of genuinely good people who love to build and work hard, with their success built upon long-standing relationships anchored in honesty, trust, and fairness. Leveraging vast design and build experience, D&B is the conduit for business owners, corporations, and developers looking to enhance the places in which they work, grow, and invest. Completing projects safely, within budget, and on time to minimize any disruption to business is always top priority. For more information, visit online at: dbconstructiongrp.com.

“Tenant fit out” is a common phrase you will hear used throughout the industry. It refers to the process of making an interior space ready for occupation. Usually, it is common practice in commercial construction to keep the interior space empty so occupants can create the look and feel of their business while determining the level of refurbishment they need. While an office renovation refers to the work needing done to improve an interior design (think aesthetic revamps such as purchasing new furniture or fresh paint), a fit out involves creating a usable area within an empty space.

The Different Types of Commercial Fit-Outs

A Category A fit out is the standard for what you will find in commercial space ready for renting, with utilities such as plumbing fixtures and electrical wiring already in place. Typically, features like electrical outlets, HVAC systems, fire protection systems, raised access floors and toilets would need to be installed yet.

On the other hand, a Category B fit out requires installing features that are lacking in a Category A. In sum, this fit out focuses on making the aesthetic design specific to the business. It typically involves installing lighting, flooring, painting, partitioning, window treatments, furniture, and branding to make the office yours.

 

 

A core and shell fit out refers to a space that already has the framework of the building in place and is ready to be custom fit to its specifications. These fit outs typically include the following tasks:

-Floor installation

-Partition walls

-Ceilings

-Power and Lighting

-Painting

-Furnishings and fixtures (such as casework and millwork)

-Changes or updates that may be needed for structural elements of the space, such as the placement of windows and doors

-Updates that may be needed to HVAC (such as extending into other spaces with ductwork and controls), Electric, Sprinkler systems, etc.

-Cabling and wiring for internet connectivity and communication arrangements (fire alarms and other protection systems)

 

What to Consider When Contemplating an Office Fit-Out for Your Business:

Fitting out an office space for your organization is a big undertaking that – when done correctly – can have a lasting impact for many years to come. It all starts in the pre-construction phase, where the proper planning and design of your space will ensure a smooth project throughout the duration of construction. Here are a few things to consider:

-An office fit out is an organization’s opportunity to take a blank canvas and make it their own. Consider how you can organize your space to increase workflow and enhance your staff’s performance. Do this by evaluating how the workspace will be used and all that needs to be in it for your team to efficiently complete their jobs.

-Plan for the future. If you ask yourself questions like “How will my business / industry grow and change over the next few years?” and “Will the proposed space be able to accommodate expansion in the future?” you can avoid needing to make renovations sooner than you’d like. As a result, your organization will save money by avoiding having to interrupt business to make changes to your office space.

-Make flexibility top of mind. Consider how technology advances and new trends may impact your office’s workflow. Does your space have the flexibility to adapt to such rapid change?

 

The Right General Contractor Makes all the Difference:

Most importantly, make sure the people you surround yourself with during this process are reliable, organized, and great communicators. A good General Contractor will help you navigate all of the points listed above.

D&B Construction Superintendent, Joseph, is no stranger to Tenant Improvements, regularly completing fit-outs for our clients like Cardiology Consultants of Philadelphia. He shares some tips on what to look for in the right GC for the job:

-Your GC should provide a dedicated project team to oversee your fit out. In order to make sure the job runs as smoothly and efficiently as possible, your GC should lead the project team in meticulously going over your project’s logistics and specifications in pre-construction. This may include working with your property management team, building architects and engineers, and other tenants in your building.

-Look for a conscientious GC who is actively working out and updating schedule details to limit any type of disruption or inconvenience to your current operations. A constant open line of communication and attention to detail ensures your project is completed on time.

-Weekly client meetings organized by the contractor of your fit out are a good way to ensure you are always fully aware of your project’s progress. Regular touch bases also enable the team to target any changes that you may want to make during the course of construction.

-A good GC will have a well-established relationship and open line of communication with their subcontractors. At D&B, our team works hand in hand with our trade partners to achieve perfection on your project. Our high standard of cleanliness, safety, and quality of work shows through the duration of the project.

 

 

“The bottom line comes down to this,” explains Joe: “When the project is completed the client should feel like we exceeded their expectations of the finished product. Starting with the pre-construction team and ending with the final cleaning of the project, we take extreme pride in the work we deliver, as well as the relationships formed with our clients. This makes all the difference.”

 

A transitional photo showing the before and after shots throughout one of our many medical office fit outs

for our client, Bucks County Orthopedic Specialists.

                                     
We’ve had the pleasure of getting to know Luca over the past year as he shadowed members of our team on D&B job sites and in the office. Luca gained valuable hands-on experience from experienced members of our team leading the project for Stratix Systems’ new headquarters in Wyomissing. He also got to shadow members of our residential sister company, D&B Elite Custom, and watch a custom home come to life while also seeing finishing touches to a home renovation.

 

Join us in wishing Luca continued success as he pursues his degree in Civil Engineering at Drexel University! We know he will accomplish great things.

How his days at D&B were spent:

“The majority of my days were spent on jobsites shadowing site superintendents. My responsibilities included communicating with my intern supervisor, site supervisors, signing in on jobs, wearing appropriate safety equipment on site, and completing weekly site inspections when needed.”

 

What he learned:

“A lot of valuable skills and information on how a construction management business runs both in the office and on the site. Some of the skills I learned was the importance of communication on the jobsite and in the office. I was able to sit in on meetings in the office and also saw communication take place on the job site through formal meetings, RFIs, and informal communication when the job superintendent talks with subcontractors onsite.”

 

Some of his favorite memories:

“Some of my favorite memories are coming back to my internship after Winter or Spring break. My supervisors were very excited to see me since they hadn’t seen me in over a week, and it was the best feeling. Another favorite thing to do is to look back at the old photos on Procore and see the progress that has been made on the sites I have been attending the company. I have seen rubble turn into an 8,000 SF home.”

 

What he is most proud of:

“Everything that I was able to accomplish from this internship within the past year. Looking back and seeing everything I have done and learned from this amazing experience has been great.”

 

How this internship impacted him:

“This internship has helped me influence my plans for the future. Before this internship, my plan was to attend college to study civil engineering, and although that plan hasn’t changed I owe the confidence I now have for this major to this internship with D&B. Being at a company almost every day now for the past year has helped me truly understand my passion. This provides comfort to me because I can finally say with confidence that I know what I am doing in my future. I am very thankful for both this internship program and D&B for providing me with this comfort.”

 

Luca with some of the main team members he worked with throughout his internship: Barry, Site Superintendent at Stratix Systems’ jobsite; Jess, Internship Committee Chair; Rachel, Office Coordinator and Bryan, Foreman at Stratix Systems’ jobsite

Wyomissing, PA – On Monday, May 9, Stratix Systems and D&B Construction held a topping off ceremony to commemorate the completion of the fifth floor of Stratix Systems’ new corporate headquarters at 200 North Park Road, Wyomissing. This 80,000 SF building, which is currently receiving extensive exterior and interior renovations, was part of the original Wyomissing Industries. View coverage from the event here!

Learn more about the details and history of this adaptive reuse project here on our blog.

“Topping Off” is a long-standing tradition among construction workers that commemorates the completion of the building’s structure as the final steel beam is placed. In attendance for the topping off ceremony were building owner and future tenant, Stratix Systems, the general contractor, D&B Construction, the project architect, RHJ Associates, the Project Engineer, Martarano Engineering, Inc., the Structural Engineer, Structure Labs, LLC, and the steel trade partner, United Weld Services LLC.

 

President of Stratix Systems, Brent Simone, signs the final beam before it is placed by our steel partner United Weld Services LLC during the topping off ceremony on Monday, May 9

 

Members of Martarano Engineering, Inc. sign the beam during the topping off ceremony

 

Our trusted Trade Partner United Weld Services LLC prepares to lift up the final beam to complete the fifth floor of this 80,000 SF building!

 

The final beam in route to be placed at the top of the building

 

United Weld Services LLC doing what they do best!

 

Dan Gring, Chief Executive Officer of D&B Construction, commented on the importance of high-end commercial office renovations such as this one: “Adaptive reuse projects like the Stratix Systems corporate headquarters are important because they revitalize historic buildings, creating a stronger future in the community. We’re thrilled to lead the project team.”

According to Brent Simone, Stratix Systems president, “We think it’s important for us to reinvest in our community. In fact, we’re committed to that philosophy. That’s why we chose the former Wyomissing Industries property. Not only is it a gorgeous building, one with a significant history for Wyomissing and Berks County, it gives us the size and flexibility to accommodate our growth for many years to come.”

 

A proud moment for everyone involved

 

Members of both Team D&B and Stratix Systems watch the last beam getting placed

 

The Simone family poses with our Chief Operating Officer, Brennan Reichenbach, and our Chief Executive Officer, Daniel Gring

 

From left to right: Wilson School District Internship Coordinator, Stefanie Wagner, Senior Honors Intern Savanna, Jake Peterson, and Ramon Marquez, Assistant Principal for Wilson

 

From left to right: Chief Executive Officer of D&B Construction Group Daniel Gring, President of Stratix Systems Brent Simone, and Chief Operating Officer of D&B Construction Group Brennan Reichenbach

 

The Simone family at the topping off ceremony

 

About Stratix Systems:

Stratix Systems is one of the region’s leading technology solutions partners. With a history that spans nearly 50 years, more than 130 IT professionals, and offices in Wyomissing, Bethlehem, King of Prussia and York, Pennsylvania, as well as Edison, New Jersey — it’s no wonder why Stratix Systems is the partner of choice for over 6,500 organizations throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Very few providers in the country can match the vast array of technology solutions and responsive service available from Stratix Systems. Whatever a client’s technology needs — Managed IT Services, Cybersecurity, Imaging & Printing Solutions or Document Management, Stratix Systems has the people, the technologies, the expertise and the experience to deliver the advanced solutions and support clients rely on. Stratix Systems has earned recognition as a member of the prestigious Inc. 5000, as well as recognition as one of the fastest growing companies from both Lehigh Valley Business and the Greater Reading Chamber Alliance. The company has also been recognized by Ricoh USA with Ricoh’s Circle of Excellence designation and Ricoh USA’s President’s Award. Stratix Systems has repeatedly earned certification as a Pros Elite 100 dealer – the only Pros Elite 100 dealer in the region – a certification that recognizes the top-shelf achievement and client service of the top 100 service organizations in the country. Learn more at www.stratixsystems.com.

 

About D&B Construction:

Founded in 2010 by Dan Gring and Brennan Reichenbach, D&B Construction has grown into one of the region’s most trusted construction firms. Headquartered in Reading, Pennsylvania the company is driven by a commitment to quality and transparency. They have grown from the two founding members to over 50 employees with an additional office outside of Philadelphia to conveniently serve the Delaware Valley region. Today they are a full-service construction management firm offering a variety of services to commercial clients in the healthcare, multi-family, professional office, retail / hospitality, institutional, and industrial sectors. Delivering an individualized, superior experience to all of our clients, D&B is a team of genuinely good people who love to build and work hard, with their success built upon long-standing relationships anchored in honesty, trust, and fairness. Leveraging vast design and build experience, D&B is the conduit for business owners, corporations, and developers looking to enhance the places in which they work, grow, and invest. Completing projects safely, within budget, and on time to minimize any disruption to business is always top priority. For more information, visit online at: dbconstructiongrp.com.

 

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